What eats mosquitoes?

Many household common household pests can be effectively dealt with by introducing a predator to the environment. For example, cats make excellent mouse and rat catchers. If you have a cat in your home, mice and rats are far less likely to invade and build their nests. But when it comes to mosquitoes, there isn’t an obvious choice of predator to help take care of them for you. T

To complicate things further, many predators only predate mosquitoes at certain stages of their life cycles. For example, some water beetle larvae will consume mosquito eggs and larvae but will only encounter them on the water’s surface. These beetles begin their lives at the bottom of the water body; they don’t reach the surface until they have started to mature.

Numerous freshwater fish species predate mosquito larvae. Pools of water containing these fish are unlikely to become infested with mosquito eggs. Similarly, tadpoles and adult newts, frogs, and toads all consume mosquito larvae. These marine animals are relatively common and make an attractive addition to any pond or pool suited to hosting them. However, you will need to clean the water before fish, or other animals can live in it. This process can be more complicated and expensive than dealing with the mosquitoes, but it will prevent future outbreaks.

Certain fly species will predate adult mosquitoes and emerging larvae. These flies often like to hang out around the same water bodies that attract mosquitoes; they will often target female mosquitoes as they lay their eggs.

Some bird species target mosquitoes, including several types of tits; marsh tits are particularly effective at hunting them. Robins and blackbirds will also snap up a mosquito if they get the chance.

Encouraging or introducing any of the creatures above to your property will make it a much more hostile environment for mosquitoes and keep their numbers to a minimum.

At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio digni goikussimos ducimus qui to bonfo blanditiis praese. Ntium voluum deleniti atque.

Melbourne, Australia
(Sat - Thursday)
(10am - 05 pm)