How Long Do Flies Live?

So How Long Do Flies Live? Flies are one of the most common pests found in UK homes and businesses. While they don’t pose a major health threat, they can be annoying and can spread germs and bacteria. Knowing more about the lifespans of flies can help in controlling them.

How Long Do Flies Live?
How Long Do Flies Live?

Most species of flies have a lifespan of about a month, depending on the species and the conditions they are living in. However, some species of flies can live for up to a year. In this article, we will discuss how long do flies live, the common UK fly species and how to identify them, as well as their colour, size, description, notes, habitat, behaviour and lifecycle.

 

Common UK Fly Species and Identification

 

The UK is home to a large variety of fly species, some of which are common pest species. Here are some of the most common UK fly species and how to identify them:

 

Housefly (Musca domestica):

The housefly is the most common fly species found in the UK. It is easily identifiable by its greyish brown body and four stripes on its thorax. It has large, red eyes and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Colour: 

The housefly is greyish brown in colour.

 

Size: 

The housefly is about 8–10 mm in length.

 

Description: 

The housefly has four stripes on its thorax, large red eyes and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Habitat:

 

The housefly can be found in a variety of habitats, from homes to farms.

 

Behaviour: 

The housefly is a scavenger that feeds on any available organic material. It is also known to carry a variety of diseases.

 

Lifecycle: 

The housefly has a life cycle of about two weeks. The eggs hatch into larvae (maggots) which then develop into pupae before emerging as adults.

 

Lesser Known Facts

 

The housefly can carry over 100 different kinds of disease-causing bacteria and it has been known to spread salmonella, dysentery and tuberculosis.

 

Blue bottle fly

 

The blue bottle fly (Calliphora vicina) is another common fly species in the UK. It is easily identifiable by its bright blue colour and long antennae.

 

Colour: 

The blue bottle fly is bright blue in colour.

 

Size: 

The blue bottle fly is about 10–12 mm in length.

 

Description: 

The blue bottle fly has a bright blue colour, long antennae and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Habitat: 

The blue bottle fly is mostly found in warm, moist areas such as garbage dumps, sewers and compost piles.

 

Behaviour: 

The blue bottle fly is a scavenger that feeds on decaying organic matter, such as dead animals and plants.

 

Lifecycle: 

The blue bottle fly has a life cycle of about two weeks. The eggs hatch into larvae (maggots) which then develop into pupae before emerging as adults.

 

Lesser Known Facts

 

The blue bottle fly is a species of blowfly and it is known to be attracted to light.

 

 

 

Cluster Fly (Pollenia rudis):

 

The cluster fly is a large, hairy fly that is commonly found in the UK. It is easily identifiable by its yellowish-brown body and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Colour: 

The cluster fly is a yellowish-brown in colour.

 

Size: 

The cluster fly is 8–10 mm in length.

 

Description: 

The cluster fly has a large, hairy body and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Habitat:

 

The cluster fly is commonly found in homes and other buildings.

 

Behaviour: 

The cluster fly is a scavenger that feeds on decaying organic matter.

 

Lifecycle: 

The cluster fly has a life cycle of about four weeks. The eggs hatch into larvae (maggots) which then develop into pupae before emerging as adults.

 

Lesser Known Facts

 

The cluster fly can spread diseases such as salmonella, dysentery and tuberculosis.

 

Horse fly (Tabanus bovinus):

 

The horse fly is a medium-sized fly that is easily identifiable by its large eyes and dark, short-haired body. Its wings are held close to its body when resting

 

Colour: 

The horse fly is black in colour.

 

Size: 

The horse fly is about 8–10 mm in length.

 

Description: 

The horse fly has large eyes and a dark, short-haired body. Its wings are held close to its body when resting.

 

Habitat: 

The horse fly is found in all kinds of habitats, such as grasslands, woodlands and around livestock.

 

Behaviour: 

The horse fly is a predator, feeding on other insects and small animals. It is also a nuisance pest, as it bites humans and animals.

 

Lifecycle: 

The horse fly has a life cycle of about two weeks. The eggs hatch into larvae (maggots) which then develop into pupae before emerging as adults

 

Lesser Known Facts

 

The horse fly is known to be a carrier of some serious diseases, such as Sleeping Sickness, West Nile Virus and Equine Infectious Anaemia.

 

 

 

Fruit Fly (Drosophila melanogaster):

 

The fruit fly is a small, yellowish-brown fly that is commonly found in the UK. It is easily identifiable by its yellowish-brown body and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Colour: 

The fruit fly is a yellowish-brown in colour.

 

Size: 

The fruit fly is about 3–4 mm in length.

 

Description: 

The fruit fly has a small, yellowish-brown body and its wings are held over its body when resting.

 

Habitat:

 

The fruit fly is commonly found near decaying or rotten fruit.

 

Behaviour: 

The fruit fly is a scavenger that feeds on decaying organic matter.

 

Lifecycle: 

The fruit fly has a life cycle of about two weeks. The eggs hatch into larvae (maggots) which then develop into pupae before emerging as adults.

 

Lesser Known Facts

 

The fruit fly is known to spread diseases such as salmonella, dysentery and tuberculosis.

 

Conclusion

 

Flies are a common pest found in the UK and can be annoying and spread disease. Knowing more about the lifespans of flies can help in controlling them. Most species of flies have a lifespan of about one month, although some species can live for up to a year. In this article, we discussed how long do flies live, the common UK fly species and how to identify them, as well as their colour, size, description, notes, habitat, behaviour and lifecycle.

 

Pest Control for Flies

 

If you are having a problem with flies, there are several fly pest control techniques you can use. The most common methods of controlling flies are using fly traps, insecticides and sprays. Fly traps are a great way to catch and eliminate flies, while insecticides and sprays can be used to help keep the flies away. If you are having a problem with flies, it is important to speak to a professional pest control company.

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